Green Ted

Canary Wharf, February 2018

Old Flo, Torsion II, Couple on Seat, Two Men on a Bench, Returning to Embrace, Vortex

Green Ted and  Henry Moore's Old Flo

There is a list of public art at Canary Wharf here.

See also September 2019.


Old Flo, Henry Moore, 1957-8

Green Ted and  Henry Moore's Old Fl
Old Flo, Henry Moore, 1957-8
a.k.a Draped Seated Woman
Cabot Square, Canary Wharf.
24th Feb 2018, 13:41
Olympus EM10, Panasonic 20mm (40mm)
Cat 2,140

GT

Cat. 2,140-1. Quote from the East London Advertiser.

Henry Moore’s treasured ‘Old Flo’ sculpture was unveiled today back in east London after 20 years languishing in a field in Yorkshire and surviving attempts to sell it off, a High Court battle for ownership and dodging a hurricane.
Roads around Canary Wharf were closed off during the night as a giant crane arrived carrying the one-and-a-half tonne ‘Draped Seated Woman’ sculpture and carefully lowered it down in Cabot Square. The crane operation was a bit ‘touch and go’ after Monday’s delay in the wake of Hurricane Brian at the weekend causing blustery winds. But the weather held and the bronze sculpture was finally lowered onto its new plinth and formally unveiled at 11am.
It was shunted away from Stepney when the Stifford housing estate was pulled down in 1997 where it had been ‘seated’ outside Wickham and Ewhurt tower blocks for 35 years and climbed on by generations of children, then transported to a field in Yorkshire for safe-keeping. But it was former Tower Hamlets Tory councillor Tim Archer who discovered its whereabouts on a visit to the Yorkshire Sculpture Park back in 2009 and began a campaign to get it returned. eastlondonadvertiser.co.uk

Torsion II, Charles Hadcock, 2009-11

Green Ted and Torsion II, Charles Hadcock
Torsion II, Charles Hadcock, 2009-11
Canary Wharf
24th Feb 2018, 13:34
Olympus EM10, Panasonic 20mm (40mm)
1/500 sec; f/5.0; ISO 200
Cat 2,142

Torsion II, Charles Hadcock

Cat. 2,142-3. Quote from Canary Wharf, Art on the Estate

Charles Hadcock’s Torsion II has been described as being like a stairway to the stars. It is an example of the artist’s practice of revisiting his sculptures over time, transforming them in the process, part of his strategy to kick-start new ideas and new sources of inspiration. Here Hadcock added further sections to an existing work Torsion I, already a tall spiralling form, as he was preparing for his exhibition in Canary Wharf’s Jubilee Park in Spring 2011. Torsion II and Helisphere were purchased for the collection. canarywharf.com

Couple on Seat, Lynn Chadwick, 1984

Green Ted and Couple on Seat, Lynn Chadwick
Couple on Seat, Lynn Chadwick, 1984
Canary Wharf
24th Feb 2018, 13:45
Olympus EM10, Panasonic 20mm (40mm)
1/250 sec; f/3.2; ISO 200
Cat 2,144

Green Ted and Couple on Seat, Lynn Chadwick Green Ted and Couple on Seat, Lynn Chadwick Green Ted and Couple on Seat, Lynn Chadwick Green Ted and Couple on Seat, Lynn Chadwick

Cat 2,144-8. There's a rather good photograph of the piece here. The second photograph of the work is an in-camera panoramic on the iPhone 7+. Quote from Sotheby's

Chadwick's work in an architect’s office before the war gave him an exceptional understanding of line and scale. His first exhibition in 1950 at the Gimpel Fils gallery was widely critically acclaimed. Two years later he was chosen to represent Britain at the Venice Biennale where he was noticed by an admiring public. The Museum of Modern Art in New York purchased his aggressively formed The Inner Eyeand soon international collectors and admirers followed Chadwick’s output. His success culminated in 1956 when Chadwick edged out Alberto Giacometti to win the International Sculpture Prize in Venice.
The evolution of Chadwick’s sculpture can be seen through the change in his stylistic formula - spiked forms of great internal tension and disharmony developed into simpler and more sentimental figures. Immediately following the war, Chadwick’s output consisted of largely belligerent avian creatures that seemed to stalk their environment creating a sense of fear and paranoia. The symbolisation of the post-war era characterised many artist’s works of the period. Whilst the manner in which Chadwick worked stayed the same, always preferring to construct rather than to model, his style shifted dramatically. The harsh textures and claw-like spikes of the 1950s were replaced by smoother surfaces and less visceral visual imagery including human-like figures.
Seated figures characterise Chadwick’s later output. Throughout the late twentieth century these figures began to appear in sculpture parks and public spaces around the world, from Seoul to Tel Aviv. The concept of enduring love between man and woman is symptomatic of the simplicity, both in material and style. sothebys.com

Two Men on a Bench, Giles Penny, 1995

Green Ted and Giles Penny's Two Men on a Bench
Two Men on a Bench, Giles Penny, 1995
Canary Wharf
24th Feb 2018, 13:55
iPhone 7+, 4mm (28mm)
1/400 sec; f/1.8; ISO 20
Cat 2,149

Green Ted and Giles Penny's Two Men on a Bench Green Ted and Giles Penny's Two Men on a Bench Green Ted and Giles Penny's Two Men on a Bench Giles Penny's Two Men on a Bench

Cat. 2,149-53. Quote from Christie's.

Formerly trained in painting, Penny often initiates his ideas from painting or lithography, which he then develops at a later stage into sculptures. This sense of illustration can be seen in the present work, where the artist beautifully simplifies the forms of the two figures, delineating their facial features through a series of carved marks and careful mouldings. Two men on a bench is wonderfully symmetrical with the two figures sitting side by side, looking away from each other, the soft organic curves of their forms, unifying the two figures. Cast in a grey patina there is something tranquil about the present work with the figures deep in contemplation. Such treatment of the figure is recurrent in Penny’s work, with the artist utilising the human figure as a vehicle for his emotions. Manipulating and abstracting the human form Penny instils a great sense of expression within his sculptures, often portraying an innocent humorous quality to his work, as seen here. christies.com

Returning to Embrace, Jon Buck, 1999

Green Ted and Returning to Embrace, Jon Buck
Returning to Embrace, Jon Buck, 1999
Canary Wharf
24th Feb 2018, 14:16
Olympus EM10, Panasonic 20mm (40mm)
1/160 sec; f/2.5; ISO 20
Cat 2,154

Green Ted and Returning to Embrace, Jon Buck Green Ted and Returning to Embrace, Jon Buck Returning to Embrace, Jon Buck

Cat. 2,154-7. Quote from Canary Wharf, Art on the Estate.

Jon Buck’s sculpture appears to show a couple locked together, gazing into each other’s eyes. Closer examination reveals a strange fusion of forms, their bodies so far intertwined as to have become a single organism. Central to Buck’s work is an interest in our connection to the natural world and his figures depict not only men and women but also Man and Nature. He has long been fascinated by art outside the Western tradition, particularly African sculpture. canarywharf.com

Unity of Opposites: Vortex, Michael Lyons, 2001

Green Ted and Unity of Opposites: Vortex, Michael Lyons
Unity of Opposites: Vortex, Michael Lyons, 2001
Canary Wharf
24th Feb 2018, 14:24
Olympus EM10, Panasonic 20mm (40mm)
1/320 sec; f/3.5; ISO 200
Cat 2,158

Unity of Opposites: Vortex, Michael Lyons

Cat. 2158-9. Quote from Axisweb

'Unity of Opposites: Vortex' was originally made in plaster for Tsinghua University's 'Art and Science' Exhibition at China National Art Gallery in 2001. The plaster sculpture was later used as the template for the copper version fabricated in Beijing and the name changed to 'Unity of Opposites: Vortex'. It was bought by the Canary Wharf Group and sited near Canary Wharf Cross Rail Station, London in 2015 axisweb.org