Green Ted

Sculpture in the City

Page 3

Green Ted place

These are the other pieces encountered after the SitC snaps. I was particularly pleased to wander past Liverpool Street and at last snap the Kindertransport, a long-time target. The Berlin Kindertransport is here. I must try to get the other two in Rotterdam and Danzig.


Kindertransport, Frank Meisler

Green Ted and Kindertransport, Frank Meisler
Kindertransport, Frank Meisler
Liverpool Street Station
29th June 2018, 14:17
Fuji X-M1, 16-50 @ 16mm (24mm)
f/9; ISO 400
Cat. 4,300-08

Green Ted and Kindertransport, Frank Meisler Green Ted and Kindertransport, Frank Meisler Green Ted and Kindertransport, Frank Meisler Green Ted and Kindertransport, Frank Meisler Green Ted and Kindertransport, Frank Meisler Green Ted and Kindertransport, Frank Meisler Green Ted and Kindertransport, Frank Meisler Green Ted and Kindertransport, Frank Meisler, plaque

Quote from Black Cab London, from which I learned that there is an earlier Kindertransport tribute at Liverpool Street [photographed 4th August].

The second Kindertransport memorial at Liverpool Street Station can be found just outside one of the entrances, standing on a relatively peaceful area which has been named ‘Hope Square’.
Unveiled in 2006 by Prince Charles, the sculpture was created by Frank Meisler- who himself was a Kindertransport refugee, arriving from the Polish city, Gdansk in 1939.
Frank’s Liverpool Street sculpture is actually part of a series, having three counterparts across Europe which chronicle the route of the Kindertransport. The other sculptures can be found at Gdansk station in Poland, Berlin’s Friedrichstrasse station (which also commemorates the many more unfortunate youngsters who boarded more sinister trains to the death camps) and Rotterdam; the port from where the children would depart for the assured safety of England. blackcablondon.net

City Wing, Christopher Le Brun

Green Ted and City Wing,Christopher Le Brun
City Wing, Christopher Le Brun
Threadneedle Walk, EC2
29 June 2018, 14:30
Fuji X-M1, 16-50 @ 16mm (24mm)
f/9; ISO 400
Cat. 4,310-11

Green Ted and City Wing,Christopher Le Brun

Quote from Expedition, an engineering practice who participated in the work.

The sculpture takes the form of an inclined wing, constructed from bronze, rising from the plaza. The wing is several storeys high and Expedition worked alongside Morris Singer bronze foundry to design and construct the stainless steel support system to connect this 10m cantilever to the base, concealed below the paving.
The wing forms part of a new development on Old Broad Street in central London and, since its installation in June 2013, has become a focal point of the surrounding pedestrianised area and the building entrance. expedition.uk.com

Charity, Jules Dalou

Green Ted and Charity, Jules Dalou
Charity, Jules Dalou
Location
29 June 2018, 14:30
Fuji X-M1, 16-50 @ 16mm (24mm)
f/9; ISO 400
Cat. 4,320-21

Green Ted and Charity, Jules Dalou

Quote from Victorian Web

In 1877 the Broad Street Ward of the City of London commissioned Dalou to design a statue to adorn the fountain behind the Royal Stock Exchange in London. The work was erected in marble and replaced with a bronze cast in 1897.
… Dalou had been exploring the maternal theme throughout the 1870s, much to the delight of his English patrons, and had produced a number of models of both peasant and bourgeois nursing mothers. Here the modelling is loose and impressionistic, but the composition faithfully echoes the finished monument, with the young mother staring lovingly down towards her infant whilst breastfeeding her baby.
Dalou made multiple studies for the work, developing these from a group of the Madonna and Child with the infant St. John which he later destroyed. In an earlier configuration, now in the collection of The Victoria and Albert Museum, Dalou sculpted the young child with his arms stretched upwards towards his mother. In another version he experimented with including a further child at the mothers feet. victorianweb.org

George Peabody, William Wetmore Story

Green Ted and George Peabody, William Wetmore Story
George Peabody, William Wetmore Story
Royal Exchange, EC2
29 June 2018, 14:36
Fuji X-M1, 16-50 @ 16mm (24mm)
1/125 sec; f/9; ISO 400
Cat. 4,330-31

Green Ted and George Peabody, William Wetmore Story Green Ted and George Peabody, William Wetmore Story, plinth

Quote from the "Baldwin Hamey" blog, London details.

On 23 July 1869, the Prince of Wales unveiled a statue of George Peabody (1795-1869), the American merchant banker and philanthropist. It stands at the north-east corner of the Royal Exchange in what was once St. Benet Fink’s Churchyard. It was designed by William Wetmore Story (1819-1895), a fellow American who spent most of his time in Rome. Story was chosen after a design competition and was paid £2,300 for the work. Sir Benjamin Phillips, the chairman of the Peabody Memorial Committee stated that the statue was a symbol of the gratitude of the English people to Peabody for all he had done for the poor of London. baldwinhamey.wordpress.com